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Elberta Road Construction

October 1, 2010

PROJECT:  Complete road reconstruction
CHALLENGE:  Poor subsoils
SOLUTION:  Floating road system

OWNER:  MDOT M-168
CONTRACT PRICE:  $1,837,908
DESIGN ENGINEER: MDOT
CONTACT: Judy K. Browning (231)  941-1986
LOCATION:  Village of Elberta, Michigan
DATE COMPLETED:  June – October, 2010
PARTNERS: Concrete Curb, Walks and Decorative Concrete:  Rieth-Riley
STREET LIGHTING:  Zimmerman Electric
LANDSCAPING:  Expo Landscaping
VIDEO INSPECTION:  PCS
TRAFFIC CONTROL DEVICES:  Give-em-a-Break Safety
PAINTING:  Kenmark
GAURDRAIL INSTALLATION:  J&J
SELF-PERFORMED: 80%

Here’s some trivia: what was formerly Michigan’s shortest State Highway? Hint: It’s right here in northern Michigan, and thanks to some major improvements by Team Elmer’s, the road was turned over to the local municipality in November 2010 and is no longer a part of the State Highway system.

Team Elmer’s completed reconstruction of the .93-mile road, including a complex and meticulously timed, seven-staged process that had to ensure all businesses and homes remained open throughout.

To stabilize the roadway system, we employed geotextiles. First, the roadway was cut to grade. Then a woven geotextile and two layers of bi-axial tensile fabric were installed and sandwiched into the sand sub-base. Between those layers, Team Elmer's installed a gravel subgrade. The geotextile in the subgrade acts as an underground bridge protecting the entire road system. The tensile fabric and extruded polyethelyene were welded at each intersection for high load strength and to prevent the road from sinking into the poor subsoils.

Due to the poor subsoils, Team Elmer's installed the pipe system within a "wrapped burrito" of woven geotextile embedded in crushed stone. The wrapped geotextile prevents the pipe from settling. In higher water table areas, the pipe was installed in a floating system of stone below and above the pipe to keep it stationary. The pipe was also wrapped in geotextile fabric to separate sand backfill from the system.

The overall project included removal of existing concrete, storm sewer, geotextile stabilization, open graded underdrains, milling, concrete curbs and walks, retaining walls and decorative concrete, streetscape lighting, gravel and asphalt paving, including a section with a crack relief layer where concrete could not be removed.

The successful work ensured a successful transition of the short roadway from the highway system to the Village of Elberta... and the end of a trivia answer!

Click here to download a PDF of "Michigan's Shortest Highway Gets an Overhaul"


 

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